Department of Mathematical Sciences

Colloquium Series, 2017 - 2018

Purpose: To discuss mathematical research and interdisciplinary problems in all areas of mathematics and applied mathematics. Talks are welcome from faculty, graduate students, and outside speakers from academia and industry. Talks should be at a level accessible to graduate students. Students and faculty at all levels and from all departments are welcome to attend.

Date/Time Speaker Title/Abstract
Friday, October 13

3:00-4:00pm

The MAC

Prof. Emmanuele DiBenedetto

Department of Mathematics & Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics

Vanderbilt University

Title: A Wiener-type condition for the boundary continuity of Quasi-Minima of Variational Integrals

Abstract: A Wiener-type condition for the continuity at the boundary points of Q-minima, is established, in terms of the divergence of a suitable Wiener integral.

Friday, October 13

4:30-5:30pm

The MAC

Prof. Emmanuele DiBenedetto

Department of Mathematics & Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics

Vanderbilt University

Title: Phototransduction: Informing Biology with Mathematics

Abstract: Visual transduction is the process by which photons of light are converted into electrical signals by diffusion of the second messengers Calcium and cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) in the cytoplasm of the Rod Outer Segment (ROS). A mathematical model of such a transduction is presented, that accounts for the layered geometry of the Rod Outer Segments and the incisures born by the discs. The model provides an explanation for the role of incisures, believed as evolutionary residues. The model also explains the biological/structural reasons for the high filelity of the photoresponse, despite the fact that reception of photons of light is a process with several random components.

Friday, November 3

3:00-4:00pm

The MAC

Dr. Hugh Thompson

Chief Technology Officer

Symantec

Title: Radical Innovation: The Future of Cybersecurity

Abstract: With cyber threats such as the Wannacry ransomware outbreak and large-scale weaponization of IoT devices, the young discipline of cyber security is being forced to mature quickly. In this talk, we look at the threat landscape and its evolution. We will also explore how the field of cyber security is harnessing innovation and learning from other rapidly evolving disciplines.

Friday, November 17

3:00-4:00pm

The MAC

Prof. Irene Lasiecka

Department of Mathematical Sciences

University of Memphis

Title: Mathematical theory of evolutions arising in flow-structure interactions

Abstract: Fluid-structure interactions and flow-structure interactions are ubiquitous in nature. Problems such as attenuation of turbulence or flutter in an oscillating structure are prime examples of relevant applications. Mathematically, the models are represented by nonlinear Partial Differential Equations (Navier Stokes-Euler equations and nonlinear elasticity ) displaying strong boundary-type coupling at the interface between the two media. Moreover, in most models, the dynamical character of the two PDEs evolving on their corresponding domains is different and the overall system displays a parabolic/hyperbolic coupling, separated by the interface. This provides for a rich mathematical structure opening the door to several unresolved problems in the area of non-linear PDEs, dynamical systems and related harmonic analysis and geometry. This talk aims at providing a brief overview of recent developments in the area along with a presentation of the most recent advances addressing the issues of wellposedness and long time behavior of the corresponding evolutionary systems.

Past Years: 2016-2017 | Spring 2016 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2014 | Summer 2014 | Spring 2014 | Fall 2013 | Spring 2013 | Fall 2012